Tag Archive for Nascimento

Tatinge Nascimento Co-Edits Theater Volume on Brazilian Dramaturgy

Cláudia Tatinge Nascimento, associate professor of theater, is the guest co-editor of Theater, Volume 45, Number 2, published in 2015. The topic is Brazilian contemporary dramaturgy. The volume contains four Brazilian contemporary plays, translated by Elizabeth Jackson, visiting assistant professor of Portuguese at Wesleyan, accompanied by four introductory essays. 

The volume, edited by Yale University and published by Duke University Press, is the first collection of Brazilian plays published in the United States since 1988.

In addition, Tatinge Nascimento is the author of an essay titled “Subversive Cannibals: Notes on Contemporary Theater in Brazil, the Other Latin America” published in the same Theater edition, pages 5-21.

In this article, Tatinge Nascimento discusses Brazilian contemporary theater with a focus on the works of playwrights Dib Carneiro Neto, Newton Moreno, Jô Bilac and Diogo Liberano. She provides an introduction to the country’s current cultural and political climate, the influence of Oswald de Andrade’s “Cannibalist Manifesto” on contemporary Brazilian artists, and how the English-speaking world’s relative ignorance of this country positions it as the “other Latin America.”

Nascimento’s Book Praised in Theatre Journal

Book by Cláudia Tatinge Nascimento.

A book by Cláudia Tatinge Nascimento, associate professor of theater, received positive reviews in the March 2010 issue of Theatre Journal. The book, Crossing Cultural Borders Through the Actor’s Work was published by Routlege in 2009.

According to the review: “Cláudia Tatinge Nascimento asserts that much critical attention given to intercultural performance tends to appraise the production as a whole, typically assessing the work of the director— especially Eugenio Barba, Ariane Mnouchkine, Peter Brook, and Jerzy Grotowski—while discounting the role of the intercultural actor, her training, commitment, and contribution made in collaboration with the director. Shifting focus toward the intercultural actor’s training as a ‘cultural border-crosser,’ Nascimento offers ‘an examination of the intercultural actor’s process that acknowledges her autonomy and agency as an artist’ transgressing a critical bias where the actor is often viewed as subservient to the director’s