Tag Archive for Jelle De Boer

De Boer Remembered for Teaching Connecticut Geology

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer

Jelle Zeilinga de Boer, the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science, emeritus, died July 23 at the age of 81.

De Boer received his BS and PhD from the University of Utrecht before coming to Wesleyan as a postdoctoral fellow in 1963. During his early years at Wesleyan he worked closely with Geology Professor Jim Balsley in the field of paleomagnetism. In 1977, de Boer was named the George I. Seney Professor of Geology and in 1984 he was named the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Sciences.

In the 1970s de Boer worked as a joint professor at the University of Rhode Island at the Marine Sciences Institute where he was a PhD supervisor for Bob Ballard, who found the Titanic in 1985. Ballard later invited de Boer to go diving in the submersible Alvin to collect rocks in the Cayman Trough.

Originally interested in coming to the United States to study the Appalachian Mountains, de Boer’s research focused on the geotectonics of the Appalachians, Southeast Asia and South and Central America.

In 2015 de Boer received the Joe Webb Peoples Award,

de Boer, Wareham Publish Book on New Haven’s West and East Rock; Book Signing Sept. 22

Book by Jelle Zelinga de Boer and John Wareham.

Book by Jelle Zelinga de Boer and John Wareham.

Jelle Zelinga de Boer, the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science, emeritus, is the author of New Haven’s Sentinels: The Art and Science of East Rock and West Rock, published by The Driftless Connecticut Series and Garnet Books in July 2013.

John Wareham, video production coordinator for Information Technology Services, provided photographs for the book.

East Rock and West Rock are volcanic entities that were emplaced in voluminous sandstone formations some 201 million years ago. Their presence facilitated the introduction of modern (European) geologic concepts in America by Yale University Professor Benjamin Silliman and his disciples. Furthermore, more than a dozen artists, among them such illustrious painters as Frederick Church, George Durrie, Robert Havell, William Wall and John Weir, sought to capture the magic of these rock formations. Their works are classic American, uninfluenced by imported European styles and heralded the advent of plein air landscape painting in America after more than a century in which portraitures dominated its art world. Several of the artists that worked in New Haven became nationally known, but others have somehow not been given the recognition they deserve.

To celebrate his new book, New Haven’s Sentinels, de Boer will offer a talk and book signing at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22 at the New Haven Museum, located at 114 Whitney Avenue in New Haven, Conn.

Admission to the lecture is free; donations are welcomed. Copies of the book will be available for sale.

Read more about this book in this Hartford Courant article.

De Boer Curates “New Haven’s Sentinels” Exhibit

Jelle de Boer

In the 19th century, the guardian hills of New Haven known as East and West Rock, attracted much attention from poets, painters and scientists. More than two dozen painters sought to capture the magic of the Rocks and the views they allowed of the city.

Jelle de Boer, the Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Science, emeritus, has combined these artists’ works for a current exhibit at the New Haven Museum. De Boer is the author of Stories in Stone: How Geology Influenced Connecticut History and Culture.

“New Haven’s Sentinels: The Art and Science of East and West Rock” opened Jan. 12. The New Haven Register features an article on the exhibit, online here.

The painters’ combined output is classic American, little influenced by European styles, and represents an imaginative body of work with considerable depth.