Tag Archive for Donald Moon

Wesleyan to Host Gun Violence Prevention Conference Sept. 28

On Sept. 28, Wesleyan hopes to change the conversation, change the culture, and change future laws regarding gun violence in America.

During a day-long conference titled, “Marching On,” experts from Wesleyan and all over Connecticut will speak on gun violence prevention and ways to promote legislation change. The event is hosted by Connecticut Against Gun Violence, the Wesleyan Association of Christian Thinkers, Wesleyan’s Center for Community Partnerships and the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Psi Upsilon, Womanist House, Buddhist house, 200 Church residence hall and Wes Democrats.

“The evidence of preventable, unnecessary gun violence in our society is unavoidable,” said conference co-organizer Claire Wright ’16. “Wesleyan has been blessed with an engaged, socially conscious student body that has shown continued interest in changing the current gun legislation in the U.S. The conference will provide Wesleyan guests an opportunity to learn about current concerns about gun violence, methods to effectively change legislation, and organizations that are working to reduce irresponsible gun use.”

Participants may attend sessions on “Past, Present and Future of Gun Violence Prevention in Connecticut,” “Guns 101: The Terminology and Technology,” The 2014 Elections: How YOU can Impact the Results,” “Beyond Mass Shootings: The Hidden Epidemic of Gun Homicide,” “Marching for Change: Building a Movement,” “Legislative Strategy: Making Your Voice Heard,” and “Maximum Impact: Effective Social Media Strategy.”

Marty Isaac, president of the CAGV Board of Directors, and Donald Moon, the Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Professor in the College of Social Studies, professor of government, will welcome the participants. Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy will deliver the keynote address.

Students admission is free of charge.

“In order for us to truly change the U.S. legislation, we need to work consistently and continuously towards this goal,” Wright said. “For students interested in politics and social change, I believe this conference will provide empowering, useful advice, information and resources, uniting Wesleyan students with CAGV.”

For a list of speakers, to see a full schedule, see this link. To register and pay on-line visit www.cagv.org.

‘War’ Topic of Ongoing Humanities’ Lecture Series

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” Feb. 15 in the Russell House. Bachner's talk was part of the ongoing Center for the Humanities Spring Lecture Series on "War." (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

In the 1970s, veterans, activists and psychiatrists were hard at work getting the disorder that came to be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) included in the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III. During the same period, feminists were building a successful anti-rape movement that crucially insisted that rape is a form of violence.

On Feb. 15, Sally Bachner, assistant professor of English, spoke on “Rape Trauma, Combat Trauma, and the Making of PTSD: Feminist Fiction in the 1970s” during the Center for the John E. Sawyer Spring Lecture Series on War.

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

The public is invited to all CHUM lectures. (Photo by Stefan Weinberger '10)

Bachner proposed that while both of these groups sought to bring suffering – of combat veterans and rape victims, respectively – into speech, many feminist novelists of this period instead turn to the figure of the soldier to figure rape as unspeakable. PTSD functions in these texts as a technology for figuring what was initially conceived of as suppressed speech about violence against women as a putatively “unspeakable” trauma.

Bachner, who is currently completing a book on violence in contemporary American fiction titled, The Prestige of Violence: American Fiction, 1962-2002, is among a dozen guests speaking in CHUM’s ongoing lecture series. Past topics this spring include robots and war, the war between international law and politics, U.S. foreign policy with Iraq and Afghanistan and war and the nation. Most recently, Trevor Paglen, artist and