Tag Archive for beman triangle

Croucher Speaks on “Unearthing Community” Exhibit at Russell Library

Sarah Croucher, assistant professor of archaology, assistant professor of anthropology, spoke to Middletown residents at the Russell Library Sept. 12 about her lab's "Unearthing Community" exhibit that is on display this week. The exhibit explores the lives of 19th century Middletown residents through the artifacts and materials that have been excavated by Croucher, students and local community members at the Beman Triangle site near Wesleyan's campus.

Sarah Croucher, assistant professor of archaeology, assistant professor of anthropology, spoke to Middletown residents at the Russell Library Sept. 12 about her lab’s “Unearthing Community” exhibit that is on display this week. The exhibit explores the lives of 19th century Middletown residents through the artifacts and materials that have been excavated by Croucher, students and local community members at the Beman Triangle site near Wesleyan’s campus.

The houses built on this land from the 1840s were home to a community of African Americans living in Middletown, tied to the nearby A.M.E. Zion Church. Artifacts discovered in the area from 19th century trash pits shed new light on the lives of the community members, and the longstanding relationship between the church, Middletown and Wesleyan.

The houses built on this excavated land were home to a community of African Americans living in Middletown, tied to the nearby A.M.E. Zion Church. Artifacts discovered in the area from 19th century trash pits shed new light on the lives of the community members, and the longstanding relationship between the church, Middletown and Wesleyan.

Learn more about Professor Croucher’s research in this past Wesleyan Connection article or in this video. (Photos by Ryan Heffernan ’16)

 

Students Co-Curate Local Archaeology Exhibit for Middlesex Historical Society

Hyunjin "Chelsey" Cho '13, Sarah Chrystler '13, Amy Cao '15 and Sarah Croucher, assistant professor of anthropology, assistant professor of archaeology, hold artifacts collected from the "Beman Triangle" site near Wesleyan. The pieces will be on exhibit April 4-May 31 in downtown Middletown.

Hyunjin “Chelsey” Cho ’13, Sarah Chrystler ’13, Amy Cao ’15 and Sarah Croucher, assistant professor of anthropology, assistant professor of archaeology, hold artifacts collected from the “Beman Triangle” site near Wesleyan. The pieces will be on exhibit April 4-May 31 in downtown Middletown.

Between Vine Street, Cross Street and Knowles Avenue near Wesleyan, an innocuous looking triangle of land forms the “Leverett Beman Historic District,” listed on the State Register of Historic Places and part of the Connecticut Freedom Trail. This area is the site of one of the earliest planned African American communities in the United States.

Blue glass artifact from the Beman site.

Students discovered this cobalt blue glass shard at the Beman site.

During the spring of 2012, Sarah Croucher, assistant professor of anthropology, assistant professor of archaeology, led an archeological excavation at the “Beman Triangle” site. Several Wesleyan students and community members participated in the dig and unearthed dozens of materials relating to healthcare and everyday practices, such as cooking and dining.

On April 4, Wesleyan will partner with the Middlesex County Historical Society to present an exhibit featuring many artifacts from the excavation. “Unearthing Community: Archaeology of the Beman Triangle” is curated by Croucher and three students: Sarah Chrystler ’13, Amy Cao ’15 and Hyunjin “Chelsey” Cho ’13. Cho is double majoring in art history and economics and has helped curate exhibits at the Davison Art Center and Smithsonian Institution.

“Artifacts from these excavations help to build a picture of daily life in these households during the late 19th century,” Croucher explained. “Materials from one of the houses also has provided a range of artifacts which seem to relate to late-19th century pharmaceutical production, opening up conversations as to the nature of healthcare at this time.”

Multiple houses dotted the Beman Triangle landscape in the 19th century